- Start by following the rule of thirds. Try not to place your subject right in the middle unless something interesting is going on, i.e. show of emotion, action…

 

- Look around your frame and see if you want everything in there. If not, then move the frame or position yourself elsewhere.

 

- There is no shortcut to practice, but be mindful of the quality of the image, not quantity. With film, we had about 38 tries per roll. It is a good idea to be selective.

 

- Editing is just as important, how you put your story together, what message you are trying to convey. Practice putting together a photo essay of 15 images, the order of the images can create different stories.

 

- Don’t carry too much lenses! With most of my assignments, I carry two: a 35mm and a 50mm. If landscape is involved, I add the 28mm. Proving how much you can carry is not the objective and can lead to long-term health issues. Making good pictures is the priority.

 

- Get closer to your subject and once you’re there, take your time. What feels like 30 minutes may only be 10 seconds.

 

- For portraits, interact with your subjects until they relax. That is the photographer’s job, to put people at ease so they look the most natural.

 

- Remember, every face is a puzzle. It is up to the photographer to find the most flattering angle for each person. This includes fashion models.